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Submitted on
September 29, 2009
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Camera Data

Make
EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY
Model
KODAK EASYSHARE Z1012 IS Digital Camera
Shutter Speed
1/256 second
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F/2.8
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6 mm
ISO Speed
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Date Taken
Aug 15, 2009, 3:13:53 PM
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Chrysler 413 Long Ram by DetroitDemigod Chrysler 413 Long Ram by DetroitDemigod
Chrsyler 413-cid with Long Ram Intake

[link]
Introduced in 1960 by the Chrysler 300 F:
To fill the vacuum caused the loss of the Hemi, Chrysler introduced a new ram-inducted 413 cid Wedge V8 good for 375 bhp in standard form and a whooping 400 bhp in optional form. Engine hardware common to both included a hot cam, heavy-duty valve springs, low back-pressure exhaust system, dual point distributor, low- restriction air cleaner, special plugs and dual four barrel carbs. The carbs were mounted on a wild looking cross-ram manifold that put one air cleaner on each side of the engine. The stacks were 30 inches long and had to be criss-crossed to fit under the hood. These long rams were designed to produce a supercharging effect in the heart of the rpm range. At low speeds, the "long" rams worked great, but they hurt performance above 4,000 rpm. To solve that problem, Chrysler's engineers removed a section of the inner walls of the manifolds to create the optional 400 bhp engine.
375 bhp @ 5000 rpm
495 lb-ft @ 2800 rpm

1961:
Under the hood, the two Wedge V8s with "long" and "short" ram tubes carried over, but a standard axle ratio of 3.23:1 gave the 300 G a slight top speed advantage over the 300 F. On the optional 400 bhp version, a Chrysler heavy-duty three speed manual transmission replaced the expensive French four speed.
375 bhp @ 5000 rpm
495 lb-ft @ 2800 rpm

1962:
1962 saw the beginning of the end to the exclusive 300 "letter cars." Chrysler debuted a new line of non-letter Sport 300s which used a milder 383 cid two-barrel carb V8 engine standard and shared their 122 inch wheel base with Chrysler's low-priced Newport line. A real letter car, the 300 H, was still offered but it too was based on the same smaller platform to hold down production costs. The shorter wheelbase actually shaved 300 pounds and therefore increased performance. Curb weight fell to 4.050 lbs for the hardtop and 4,105 pounds for the convertible. Both 413 cid V8s were boosted by 5 bhp, to 380 bhp and 405 bhp respectively. The lighter weight and higher horsepower resulted in the best power to weight ratio (10.6 lbs per horsepower) of any 300 Letter car. Its 0-60 time of 7.7 seconds matched the 1957 Hemi powered 300 C while its quarter-mile time of 16 seconds matched the Ram Tuned 300 F.
380 bhp

1963:
Chrysler simplified its lineup for the new 300 J (there was no 300 I - perhaps they felt the "I" would be confused with "1"). The convertible version was dropped, as well as the "short" ram Wedge V8. The only engine offered was the 413 cid Wedge head V8 with "long" rams which was now rated at 390 bhp.
390 bhp @ 4800 rpm
485 lb-ft @ 3600 rpm

1964:
Chrysler reacted to the minimal sales of the 300 J with changes that would make the 1964 300 K the best selling 300 Letter car ever. The biggest news was the return of the convertible version after a one year hiatus and the introduction of a new base engine, a 413 cid V8 with 360 bhp. For an extra $375, a buyer could order the previous year's standard engine, a 413 V8 with 390 bhp. Leather trim was now a $93 option.
390 bhp @ 4800 rpm
485 lb-ft @ 3600 rpm

1965:
The 1965 300 L represented the last of the Chrysler 300 Letter cars. Nearly every feature of the 300 L either standard or optional on the non-letter 300s, there was little need to justify a seperate model line. Nevertheless, the standard 413 cid V8 with 390 bhp in the 300 L resulted in good performance.
390 bhp @ 4800 rpm
485 lb-ft @ 3600 rpm
END

1961 Chrysler 300 G
413 Long Ram-cid

Woodward Dream Cruise
Saturday, August 15th, 2009
Detroit, MI
Add a Comment:
 
:iconpatriot1776:
Patriot1776 Featured By Owner Feb 7, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
This setup still looks exotic and I wonder if anybody's considered tooling up to reproduce these manifolds but with fuel-injector and sensor bungs added so we could see how this setup would respond with modern fuel injection. I know there's far easier ways to make bucketloads of power, but this would still be great for somebody who wanted to have unique aesthetics in a modded ride that would only see street and Pro Touring work and only occasionally went to the 'strip.
Reply
:iconhotrod-302:
HotRod-302 Featured By Owner Feb 16, 2010
Those are also awesome on street rods.
Reply
:icondetroitdemigod:
DetroitDemigod Featured By Owner Feb 16, 2010
A rat rod for me personally. It's different looking.
Reply
:iconhotrod-302:
HotRod-302 Featured By Owner Feb 16, 2010
Yeah, I have one sitting in line myself. I have to finish my 69 Camaro, then focus on the 56 Belair for mom (Probably her last hot rod), then I have a 1929 Dodge 4 door I plan to rat rod.
Rats are so much fun! It'd be the second one we owned
Reply
:icondetroitdemigod:
DetroitDemigod Featured By Owner Feb 17, 2010
They are aren't they? xD You can make them into anything you wait, just have to look old, un-done, and home made.
Reply
:iconhotrod-302:
HotRod-302 Featured By Owner Feb 17, 2010
Yeah, the last one wwe had was a 36 (turned to actually be a 37) Chrysler. Modern front suspension and a full roll cage. It out-cornered any tuner it came across.
Reply
:icondetroitdemigod:
DetroitDemigod Featured By Owner Feb 17, 2010
Sweet. =D
Reply
:iconretrogrouch:
retrogrouch Featured By Owner Sep 29, 2009  Hobbyist Photographer
There was nothing like cross ram B blocks, they laid in wait under some of the most unassuming big cars.
Reply
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